Camp Futur

Website concept

An online campground for people to restore their digital senses. Camp Futur provides people interactive activities throughout the day to help them structure their digital life.

2020

PART 1 // HOW TO GET STARTED ON CAMP FUTUR?

Step 1.

Pick a campground style.

Step 2.

Customize your activity schedule.

Step 3.

Specify your preferences for each activity.
PART II // WHAT ARE THE ACTIVITIES?

Rread

draws literary content from online libraries. In this example, Camp Futur presents a poem by Ocean Vuong.

Create

presents interactive activities. In this example, campers are prompted to look around for materials and build a chair.

Explore

curates sceneries that exist in the physical world. In this example, campers explore how long it takes to fall at each of the three popular BASE jumping locations around the world.

Pause

presents moments to slow down and feel the passing of time. In this example, campers can watch the constellations and claim an available star as theirs.
PART III // WHY DO WE NEED AN ONLINE CAMPGROUND?

A bit of back story.

One evening I was looking for my phone without my glasses on. In the dark, I saw a small rectangular object, reached over for it, and tapped on its surface. Immediately I realized it was the thin lid of a wooden box, and I thought, “Wow.” That moment, I felt equally alarmed and amazed, as if suddenly discovering the threshold that separated the physical world from the virtual.

Digital living is real.

I begin to pay more attention to my interaction with digital devices, and it turns out that I rotate from one screen to another from the moment I wake up to before I fall asleep. How come so much of my everyday life takes place online? What does “online” look like, anyway? It feels strange not to be able to visualize or have a little more control over this digital environment that I now live within.

Is my digital life ok?

The majority of our current digital environment prioritizes efficiency, profit, user engagement—as a result, our human senses are often leveraged, our behaviors standardized, our focus diverted, all for the sake of distributing and consuming more content. As individuals, we have very little control over the structure of this digital environment, other than choosing to spend less or more time with it.

However, digital wellbeing is more than just screen time. Telling people to turn away from digital interactions is a simplistic response that fails to confront the fact that our life is becoming increasingly digital and connected. Human beings, as Daniel Weitzner puts it, want and need connection, and the Internet is the ultimate connection machine.

A proposal.

Perhaps we need a little space online to sit down, look around, and experiment with the structure of our digital living.

See you in the futur.